Monday, July 2, 2018

Red Oak House Garden Notes no. 42: a mostly cool June

Although we had a few scorcher days in June, most days it was cool and the Red Oak House windows remained wide open. Late June also brought the blessings of rain, an inch and a three quarters in the last days of this week. We can finally breathe a sigh of relief that the drought is over.





The vegetable garden looks terrific, although the rabbits got the re-planted broccoli and have munched about 1/3rd of the carrots (these in an area outside the rabbit-proof fence). Pea harvest will begin this week and the potatoes show great promise.




My meager strawberry patch, sadly in a shaded area, rewarded me to a few bursts of flavor in my mouth. We talk of converting this patch to another use, but it is difficult to decide what to grow without ample sun (this being in the vegetable garden area).


Other bacciferous plants are being attacked by the robins, especially the juneberry and viburnum bushes. We try to be gracious with the co-inhabitants of this place and let them gorge.




Between the rabbits and some insects, the 90-some zinnias I planted this spring are down to about 25. I've dusted them with an organic powder and sprayed with Liquid Fence to save at least a few. I really like these annuals, but doubt that I will bother with any in the future as it is not worth it when I have hundreds of perennials.













We had visitors here a couple weeks back, family from Mississippi. It was a great pleasure to show my cousin some of the beauty of North Dakota on his first visit to the state, including Theodore Roosevelt National Park, where the post-burn wildflower bloom is abundant, and Fort Abraham Lincoln State Park.

Fort Abraham Lincoln blockhouse

On-A-Slant Indian Village

Purple Coneflowers

Wild horses of Theodore Roosevelt National Park, Teton's band

Northern bedstraw blooms everywhere!

Prairie Coneflower

Buck Hill, Theodore Roosevelt National Park



These are the days of summer when there is a brief pause -- the early season flowers have subsided and the daylilies will soon explode in color. The walleye bite on the river has slowed and all talk here is of how high the river is with the massive releases from Lake Sakakawea.

Soon each day will be filled with harvesting the vegetables. A few early season daylilies and hosta have begun to bloom and much of our time is spent sitting on the back patio watching the never-still House wren pair busily raising their brood. I captured a short video here and if you listen closely you will hear the little ones cheeping frantically as the adults arrive with insects.

Eenie Weenie daylily

First Bird Daylily

Amber Wheels and Arizona Sun gallardia



Now for some thoroughly enjoyable Fourth of July celebrations in Bismarck-Mandan with lots of fun, family, and fireworks!



p.s. about the time I was publishing this, the baby House wrens flew the nest box. Pretty quiet on our patio now.


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